Queen Elizabeth Park Turns 75!

Come out and join the celebration! This Sunday is a family-fun filled free day throughout Queen Elizabeth Park, honouring its 75th Anniversary!

Large Quarry Garden at Queen Elizabeth Park

There will be much to do! Take in a free concert, enjoy the Stanley Park Brewing licensed area, be awed by the aerial acrobatics of CircusWest, stop in and chat with the parrots at the Bloedel Conservatory (free admission), take a thrill ride on the $5.00 Zipline, or try your skill at free Pickleball, Pitch & Putt and Lawn Bowling, plus much more!

WHO: All Ages – Free

WHEN: Sunday, September 13th  Noon – 7pm

WHERE: Queen Elizabeth Park Plaza, Lawn Bowling Centre, Tennis Courts

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Stage schedule

Time  Event/Entertainment
12:00 noon to 12:30pm Opening Speeches
12:30pm to 1:30pm Pop Junkies
1:45pm to 2:45pm Hot Panda
3:00pm to 4:15pm Patrick Nazemi
4:30pm to 5:30pm The Zolas
5:45pm to 7:00pm Delhi 2 Dublin
2:00pm, 3:30pm, and 5:00pm Aerial show by CircusWest at the fountain plaza

All day activities from Noon to 7:00pm

zipline sm•  Stanley Park Brewing licensed area

•  $5.00 zipline rides

•  Free pitch & putt

•  Free admission at the Bloedel Conservatory

•  Face painting at the fountain plaza

•  Photo booth at the fountain plaza

•  Pickleball at the tennis courts

•  Free drop-in at the QE lawn bowling club



It will be a fantastic day! Something to do for everyone in the family! Come out and celebrate this beautiful park at the highest point in the City!

Quick History of Queen Elizabeth Park

Queen Elizabeth Park is a city landmark, once known affectionately as ‘Little Mountain’ as its summit is just over 501 feet and is located at the geographic centre of the city. The land was originally owned by the Canadian Railway and was turned into a basalt rock quarry between 1890 – 1911. Rock from the quarry was used to build the first roadways in Vancouver.

In 1912, the Canadian Pacific Railway first offered the land to the City of Vancouver. No action was taken at the time, but it was reserved for park purposes. In 1929, Vancouver amalgamated with the municipalities of Point Grey and South Vancouver. It then proceeded to acquire the property from CP Rail. By the end of the 1930’s, it was turned over to the Vancouver Park Board.

King George Queen Mum Vancouver Archives#CVA 371-100

1939 was a historic year! King George VI and his consort Queen Elizabeth traveled the Country on their first official Canadian tour. The royal couple traveled from the east to the west coast on the Canadian Pacific Railroad. While in Vancouver, they visited North and West Vancouver, Stanley Park, UBC and Little Mountain.

In July 1940, Little Mountain was officially renamed “Queen Elizabeth Park” in dedication to the visit from the royal couple. From that time, with $5,000 per year funding from Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, Park staff began transforming the overgrown hillsides into Canada’s first civic arboretum, with over 1500 species of trees. Examples of all the native trees found across the nation were planted along with many exotic species to create the beautiful landscape, which is Queen Elizabeth Park today.

Queen Elizabeth Park covers 52 hectares (130 acres) and is one of the most beautifully maintained public parks in the world. It is second only to Stanley Park in annual visitations, receiving nearly 6 million people per year.

Celebrate National Garden Days!

It’s time to top and smell the flowers with Vancouver’s Garden Pass!

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Orange hibiscus in bloom at the Bloedel Conservatoy. Photo © V. Earle

Just in time for Father’s Day, Canada’s National Garden Days draws attention to public and private gardens across the country! Garden Days (June 19 – 21) celebrate the role of gardens in our communities and in our lives. The program’s objective is to draw attention to Canada’s garden culture, its history and innovations, and to underscore the important values of gardening and environmental stewardship. When the Bloedel Conservatory opened in December, 1969, Prentice Bloedel dedicated this lush green jewel “to a better appreciation and understanding of the world of plants”. It has been connecting people with the magic of the tropics ever since!

This year, 5 incredible public gardens have united to offer a special Vancouver Garden Pass for the celebration. Pass holders can visit any of the gardens as many times as they wish over 3 days for $25.

Buffon's Touraco at the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo © V. Earle

Buffon’s Touraco at the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo © V. Earle

Experience phenomenal collections of plants from all over the world, history and award winning architecture at:

Bloedel Conservatory: 4600 Cambie St, Vancouver at Queen Elizabeth Park

Dr. Sun Yat Sen Classical Chinese Garden: 578 Carrall St, Vancouver in Chinatown

Nitobe Memorial Garden: 1895 Lower Mall, Vancouver at UBC

UBC Botanical Garden: 6804 SW Marine Drive, Vancouver at UBC

VanDusen Botanical Garden: 5251 Oak St, Vancouver

Ticket options are $25 for individual, $40 for a couple, and $5 for children 5 to 18 years of age (taxes not included).

Buy your tickets in advance online, or at any of the participating gardens during the 3 day celebration. Present your tickets at any one of the five Gardens to receive your wristband-pass. Then, simply present your wristband on June 19th, 20th or 21st at any of the participating Gardens for entry.

Entrance to the Bamboo Bridge in the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo by Vicky Earle

Entrance to the Bamboo Bridge in the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo by Vicky Earle

It will be a great weekend! See you there!

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Special Mother’s Day Event at the Bloedel Conservatory!

Looking for a unique venue to delight Mom on Mother’s Day?

Treat her to a special day at the Bloedel Conservatory and Queen Elizabeth Park on May 10th!

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The Bloedel Conservatory is now on Summer Hours and just in time for Mother’s Day! There will be much to do for the whole family! Not only is the Conservatory a healing garden – a magical place to unwind and relax in the lush atmosphere of the tropics, we’ve assembled a treat package that you can pre-purchase for Mom to receive when she arrives on Mother’s Day. This $28 package includes one adult admission to the Conservatory, special treats from Truffles Fine Foods, Daniel’s Chocolates, Barefoot Venus, and Evian, plus an exclusive silver Umay pendant ($20 value shown below) designed by the Katami Studio. “Umay” is Turkish for Hope and was also a goddess offering luck. This pendant was formed from a raw and imperfect seashell and each is cast by hand to ensure the finest quality.

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Stations will also be set up around the Conservatory during the event: Learn all about orchids and their care with Vancouver Orchid Society specialist Margaret Pratt; Visit the craft table for kids so they can plant a starter herb and create their own Mother’s Day card to gift to Mom; Artists from the Katami Design Studio will be hosting a jewellery trunk show and eat or visit Season’s in the Park Restaurant for brunch or dinner. So much to do! And don’t forget to bring your camera. The park gardens are stunning with spring blossoms and the chatty parrots at the Bloedel Conservatory are sure to delight the entire family. A very lovely day to celebrate Mom!

Advanced purchase for the Mother’s Day Treat Package required: Contact bloedelevents@vancouver.ca

or buy online: HERE

 The Conservatory is open until 8pm. Mother’s Day Special Event hours: 10am – 4pm

Regular admission applies. Walk-ins welcome. Wheelchair accessible.

Adults (19-64) $6.50     Seniors (65+) $4.50      Youth (13-18) $4.50      Child (3– 12) $3.25      Family  $15

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Bloedel Conservatory Summer Hours:

Monday – Friday: 9am – 8pm
Saturday & Sunday: 10am – 9pm

Also brand new for the summer months: Health and Wellness Programs are now scheduled at Bloedel.

Join instructor Shelagh Smith on May 21st, June 18th, or July 16th, 2015 from 6:30 pm to 8:00 pm for the Rapt in Nature Tropical Walk Series.

Nature plays a profound and essential role in our health, happiness and productivity. Learn about the evidence-based benefits of enjoying nature and try out mindful and playful techniques to deepen your connection to plants, birds and ecological systems. Ms. Smith is a registered horticultural therapist who has developed and facilitated horticultural therapy programs since 1994 for a variety of participant groups, including residents in long-term care, people with disabilities, street-involved youth living in Vancouver’s downtown Eastside, people with mental health issues, and healthcare providers. Enjoy this guided walk with Ms. Smith in the warmth and beauty of the Bloedel Conservatory. Price: Member: $10 / Non-member: $15

Purchase tickets online at Eventbrite

The Bloedel Conservatory Joins the Pollinator Project!


Mason bee (Osmia cornifrons). Photo by Beatriz Moisset, Creative Commons

With Spring in full swing and lots of blossoms at the Bloedel Conservatory, it is a perfect time to introduce Mason Bees into the lush iconic dome. Mason Bees are an early Spring pollinator. Unlike Honey Bees that live and work in a community, Mason Bees are solitary. Because there is no Queen bee, they do not sting. This makes the Mason Bee ideal for public places where visitors of every age can be in close proximity to observe their work.

Mason Bees are considered superior pollinators (especially for fruit trees), true “work horses” of the garden. They are a fast bee, visiting approximately 17 blossoms per minute. In fact 1 mason bee pollinates as many flowers as 100 honey bees! This is encouraging many people to introduce these bees to their own gardens by providing man-made nesting sites like the one seen below.

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Mason bee house mounted on a Butterfly Palm at the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo by Vicky Earle

Mason Bees emerge from their cocoons in the spring. The male bees are the first to come out of the nest. They remain near the nest waiting for the females. When the females emerge, they mate, then the females begin provisioning their nests. Every female bee is fertile. In nature, she makes nests in long cylindrical holes about the size of a pencil – typically in hollow twigs or abandoned nests of wood-boring beetles or carpenter bees.

Females visit flowers to gather pollen and nectar.  A mother bee then lays a single egg in a nesting tunnel and deposits a ball of gathered pollen and nectar for food when that egg hatches. Next, she builds a wall from mud or clay to close that chamber before laying the next egg and depositing the next food ball. Building these walls are how Mason Bees got their name!


Mason bee nest cell with cocoons. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons.

Amazingly, the mother bee can control the DNA to produce approximately 50% males and 50% females. Once a bee has finished with a nest, she plugs the entrance to the tube, and then may seek out another nest location. Each female can lay approximately 25 eggs. By the end of June, the nesting period is over. By late October or early November, the lavae pupate and spin silken cocoons within the nest chamber where they will lie dormant over the winter months.

Pollinators have declined in many areas but the exact causes are not known. Factors include habitat changes from growing cities, spread of disease (mites and viruses), and pesticide use.

The Pollinator Project, started in Vancouver in April of 2014, by the Parks Board and City Council, aims to make Vancouver parks and gardens friendlier to all bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. Staff began work with stewardship groups and community gardeners to raise public awareness about the value of pollinators, to facilitate habitat enhancement projects, and to assess and monitor pollinator populations. Staff also collaborated with the Environmental Youth Alliance and Hives for Humanity to help promote pollinators across the city. For more information, visit the Pollinator Project at: http://vancouver.ca/parks-recreation-culture/pollinator-project.aspx

When sourcing out pollinator friendly plants for your own garden, please avoid plants and seeds sprayed with nicotine-based insecticides (neonicotinoids). These will kill the beneficial bees and butterfly pollinators along with unwanted pests. Man-made mason bee nests, cocoons and supplies can be found at many local garden and wild bird stores in the Vancouver area.


Family Fun on Family Day at the Bloedel Conservatory!


  February 9, 2015 from 10am to 5pm

Come discover a variety of fun and exciting rainforest activities at the Bloedel Conservatory on Family Day! Activities are planned throughout the day, including bird talks, ladybug and butterfly releases (including information about why they are good for your garden), feeding the finches and more. Our docents and gardeners will be on hand to share fascinating stories about all the birds and plants that call Bloedel home, as well as a Tropical Adaptations station that provides information about unique strategies rainforest plants use to survive in this unique climate. All are free with paid admission. See the detailed schedule below:

10am – Millet feeding for the Zebra Finches

11am – Ladybug release

12pm – Bird talk

12:30pm – Butterfly release by Metamorphic Farms

1pm – Bird talk

2pm – Lady bug release

2:30pm – Butterfly release by Metamorphic Farms

3pm – Bird talk

Tropical Adaptation station, Herb potting activities, and ‘Ask me’ Docent tables will be ongoing throughout the day.

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Admission Rates

Adults             $  6.50

Seniors            $  4.50

Youth (12-18)   $  4.50

Child  (3 -11)   $  3.25

Family Rate     $ 15.00

Members: Free

Painted Lady

The Bloedel Conservatory is fully wheelchair accessible, with benches along the pathway so it’s easy to sit close to the parrots to watch their antics or have a chat! Handy Bird Guides and Scavenger Hunts are available at the front counter. Treat the whole family to a stroll through the magical Bloedel Conservatory, our green jewel at the highest point in Vancouver. There will be lots to do to delight everyone at any age! See you there!


When the Weather Outside is Frightful …

Shimmer Surprise cultivar

Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), Shimmer Surprise cultivar. Photo by Vicky Earle

Plan a visit to the Bloedel Conservatory!

It’s a warm and lush tropical get away to relax, recharge and reinvigorate the whole family during the holidays! Plus, the antics of all the birds are sure to bring a smile to everyone’s face. Currently there are hundreds of poinsettias – over a dozen different cultivars – on display for the festive season!

Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), Yellow Snow cultivar.

Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), Yellow Snow cultivar. Photo by Vicky Earle

Poinsettias are right at home at the Conservatory. While they are the most popular of all Christmas houseplants, poinsettias are actually indigenous to the tropical climates of Mexico and Central America. The Aztecs called poinsettias “Cuetlaxochitl” (from cuitlatl, for residue, and xochitl, for flower). They used the plant for its medicinal properties to control fevers and the bracts (modified leaves) were used to make a reddish dye for fabrics. Legend has it that Montezuma, the last of the Aztec kings, had poinsettias brought into what now is Mexico City by caravans because this beautiful plant could not be grown at high altitudes. Today the poinsettia is known in Mexico and Guatemala as “La Flor de la Nochebuena” (Flower of the Holy Night, or Christmas Eve). In Chile and Peru, it is called the “Crown of the Andes”.

Winter Rose Red Poinsettia

Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), Winter Rose Red cultivar. Photo by Vicky Earle

The botanical name Euphorbia pulcherrima (meaning ‘very beautiful’) was assigned to the poinsettia by the German botanist, Wilenow, because he was dazzled by its brilliant color. The poinsettia was introduced to North America in 1825 when the United States’ first ambassador to Mexico, Joel Robert Poinsett, sent several plants back to his home in Greenville, South Carolina. William Prescott, historian and horticulturist, renamed the plant ‘Poinsettia’ in honour of Poinsett.

Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), Monet Twilight cultivar

Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), Monet Twilight cultivar. Photo by Vicky Earle

The poinsettia grows in the wild as a shrub or small tree, typically reaching a height of 0.6–5 metres (2–16.5 feet). Typically, the plant has dark green leaves that measure 7–16 centimetres (2.8–6.3 in) in length. The colored bracts — which are most often flaming red but can be orange, pale green, cream, pink, white, or marbled— are often mistaken for flower petals because of their groupings and colors, but they are actually leaves. The flowers of the poinsettia are unassuming and do not attract pollinators. They are grouped within small yellow structures found in the center of each leaf bunch, and are called cyathia.

Bloedel 45th Anniversary cake

Bloedel Conservatory 45th Anniversary Cake


Once again, we send a big thank you to all who came out on December 6th to celebrate Bloedel’s 45th Anniversary! It was a fantastic party with Hawaiian Dancers, rhythms of Soul Survivors Steel Drum Band, a Professional Face Painter, Sven and Jens the whimsical and talented Scandinavian Gnomes and of course hot chocolate and cake. The party would not have been possible without the backing and organization from the Vancouver Park Board, the support of the VanDusen Botanical Garden Association, Greyhaven Exotic Bird Sanctuary and all of the fantastic Bloedel staff and volunteers. Thank you to all. We look forward to many more years and exciting things to come!

Happy Holidays!


Mark Your Calendars! The Bloedel Conservatory turns 45!

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Come out & Join the the 45th Anniversary Celebration of the Bloedel Conservatory on Saturday, December 6th

Caribbean Steel Drum rhythms will be the backdrop for a FREE DAY of festivities, including cake and refreshments, face painting, Hawaiian dancers, souvenir photos, plus Roving Docents will be on hand to share unique and interesting stories of the plants and birds that call Bloedel home. Parking is also free in the top parking lot at Queen Elizabeth Park from 10am – 4pm. It will be an all-around fun, family friendly day!

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The Bloedel Conservatory is significant for its historical, symbolic, cultural, and social values, and particularly for its use of technologies and building methods which were quite advanced for its time in 1969. The Conservatory, the fountain and the surrounding plaza were all designed to work together and with specific goals to show man’s connection to nature. The curving lines of the fountain harmonize with the Conservatory dome, while the leaping fountains add vertical movement to mirror distant trees. The dome structure, with its absence of interior supporting columns, was chosen to provide an unobstructed view of the exotic gardens within. The Bloedel Conservatory won the prestigious Vincent Massey Award for Excellence in Urban Environment in 1971, is a ‘Class A’ Heritage Building and is listed on the Canadian Register of Historic Places.

Don’t forget your cameras! There will be lots of great photo opportunities. We look forward to seeing you there!

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When? Saturday, December 6th; 10am – 4pm

Where? Bloedel Conservatory, Queen Elizabeth Park

Who? Everyone!

Admission? Free


The Bloedel Conservatory Inspires Poetry!

Orange Bishop Weaver finch

Orange Bishop Weaver Finch. Photo by Vicky Earle

“arching fronds

of the Madagascar palm—

darting finches”

by Brenda Larsen, VHG member

 Haiku poetry is defined as:

a short poem, usually of three lines, that originated from Japan. It is one of the most well known forms of poetry in the world today, written by people in many different countries.

The Bloedel Conservatory, our domed tropical oasis at the top of Queen Elizabeth Park, has become a muse for many artists in a variety of disciplines. Members of the Vancouver Haiku Group (VHG) recently met at the Conservatory for a haiku walk that included self-guided tours.

Haiku is inspired by an emotional, sensory awareness of the world around us. To gain fresh perspectives for their writing, haiku poets often gather for walks (referred to as ginko walks) at special locations known for their beauty and/or historical significance. Members of the VHG participate in workshops, public readings and walks throughout the year to inspire and support the writing of haiku. Dr. Gabi Greve, author of World Kigo Database (WKD), refers to a haiku walk on her blog as a Ginkoo and breaks the word Ginkoo into two parts: gin means singing, praising, making a poem and koo means walking. A kigo is a word that indicates the season in which the haiku takes place.

Marianne J. Dupre, a member of the VHG, who lives near and is a frequent visitor of Queen Elizabeth Park, describes a beautiful haiku walk through the Bloedel Conservatory:

Entrance to the Bamboo Bridge in the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo by Vicky Earle

Entrance to the Bamboo Bridge in the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo by Vicky Earle

Haiku on the hilltop

It was a glorious day to be inspired. After weeks of rain, it was the first real day of spring and I was out to enjoy the warmth of the sun. High above the sounds of city traffic, the hilltop was alive with activity. Children were on bicycles and skateboards, mothers and fathers pushed babies in strollers, while teens captured in-the-moment selfies on their cell phones. Even a few beaming brides and grooms strolled across my path in search of the ideal scenic backdrop for wedding album photos.

If the day wasn’t glorious enough to write about, the Bloedel Conservatory teased the muse in me. A wave of damp, earthy heat met me as I entered the front door, and the tropical city jungle was mine to explore. Rich green palms towered ahead of me, their fronds fanning the pathway, while exotic finches trilled in the treetops. Water flowed low beneath bamboo bridges, trickling into small pools with bright orange Japanese koi. Silver coins, reflecting sunlight from the glass roof, winked at me below the ripples of a pool. Along the path a small wooden waterwheel thumped and splashed steadily, feeding a small meandering stream.

Lost in my own awareness of sight, sound, and scent, I set off, my every step giving me pause for reflection. The scent of hyacinth was in the air, along with squawks from jewel-toned parrots grooming themselves, and the lighthearted sounds of children’s laughter.

I recognized houseplants we had at home like palms, ficus, bromeliads, philodendrons and corn plants, all more rich in colour, texture and size in an environment similar to their native habitat. Pastel tulips and delicate white lilies seemed to sigh open as I passed by, and brilliant azalea shrubs dazzled me with their bold hues.

On a drawbridge a girl scampered across to meet her mother, pausing for just a moment to feel the sway of the ropes. A shy boy tentatively sat next to me on a bench beneath a rubber tree then grinned on cue for his father’s camera. Another little girl talked sweetly to a branch full of small birds, coaxing them to answer her back. She didn’t notice the silver pheasant poised, confident and curious on the path behind her.

I pulled a notebook and pen from my bag, and focused my camera to record impressions that would define what my senses had captured. I lingered for more than two hours, circling the paths time and again, seeking details that may have been overlooked. Finally, with my head full of sensory images, I sat outside at the edge of the Dancing Waters fountain to write. While deep in thought, the gradual rise of jetted fountain water applauded my efforts.

More Haiku inspired by self-guided tours under the dome

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Rosie, African Grey Parrot. Photo by Vicky Earle


red-tailed Rosie says

I love you . . .

candy corn beak

by Angela J. Naccarato


photo by D Sharon Pruitt

photo by D Sharon Pruitt


a child

asks for a piggyback ride—

strangler fig

by Jessica Tremblay


Carmen and Maria, Green Winged Macaws at the Bloedel Conservatory. Photo by Vicky Earle

Carmen and Maria, Green Winged Macaws at the Bloedel Conservatory


under a wet palm leaf

the macaw munches berries

the click of the shutter

by Lynne Jambor


If you are interested in joining the Vancouver Haiku Group, new members are welcome. Currently, the VHG includes members from Vancouver and surrounding areas who meet once a month to share and discuss haiku and welcome people who are interested in learning about and writing haiku. As a member of the VHG you will learn to write contemporary English-speaking and experimental haiku through a variety of exercises. Discussions about the structure and form of haiku are based on contemporary English-style and traditional Japanese-style haiku. Membership is open to all people who are interested in writing haiku. For further information about the Vancouver Haiku Group or queries regarding membership, forward an email to Angela J. Naccarato, facilitator for the Vancouver Haiku Group, at angelan@telus.net. You can also follow VHG on Facebook: facebook.com/pages/Vancouver-Haiku-Group/1571492576409446.

A very big thank you goes to Angela Naccarato and the members of the VHG for sharing their poetry and making this post possible. The Bloedel Conservatory is open everyday (except Christmas day). Why not grab your camera, sketch or notebook and come be inspired! The muse beckons …

Bloedel Bird Guide Now Online

We are pleased to offer the newly updated Bloedel Conservatory Bird Watcher’s Checklist online! It’s free to download or simply bookmark the link below and pull it up on your Smartphone or tablet when you visit the Conservatory. We have lots of new birds. Come by soon to see Bearded Reedlings, Roul Roul Partridges (and their babies), Pekin Robins and of course all of your favorite feathered friends. Enjoy!

Bloedel Bird Watcher’s Checklist: Click link to Download

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Come Join Us! The ‘We Did It! Bubble Bash’ is on!

The completed new Bloedel Conservatory roof from above. Photo courtesy Wayne Dueck, Spectrum Skyworks.

The completed new Bloedel Conservatory roof from above. Photo courtesy Wayne Dueck, Spectrum Skyworks.

The work is done, the scaffolding is down and the Bloedel Conservatory has a gorgeous new roof!

It’s time to Celebrate!

Please join us for the We Did It! Bubble Bash taking place September 25, 2014 at the Bloedel Conservatory. Not only are we celebrating this significant renovation, we are also raising funds for new education and interpretation programs at the Conservatory.

Complex scaffolding covered the dome for 7 months while the roof replacement took place. Photo by Vicky Earle

Complex scaffolding covered the dome for 7 months while the roof replacement took place. Photo by Vicky Earle

Thanks to the fantastic teams at Spectrum Skyworks, Pacific Ropes, WestCan Scaffolding and a specialized Hazmat crew, this complex project was completed in just 7 months – a full 2 months ahead of schedule, making the dome as pristine as the day it opened nearly 45 years ago. The scaffolding, which covered the dome completely, was the largest project of it’s kind in North America and took 7 weeks to dismantle.

Specialized Rope Access team from Pacific Ropes Ltd. preparing to hang netting from the triodetic aluminum framework. Photo by Vicky Earle

Specialized Rope Access team from Pacific Ropes Ltd. preparing to hang netting from the triodetic aluminum framework. Photo by Vicky Earle


Re-establishing the Bloedel Conservatory as a visitor friendly, year-round destination is key to provide learning opportunities for all ages, connecting people to the world of plants, birds and the rainforest.

Please join us to celebrate the completion of this incredible project and to reconnect with the magic of the Bloedel Conservatory. There will be fantastic food provided by Season’s in the Park and Crown Street Catering, incredible tropical cocktail creations provided by Victoria Gin, CArribean rhythms by steel drum band Soul Survivors, great raffle prizes, free parking for event guests and more.

Don’t wait! Tickets are selling fast!

Tickets and further details are available on-line at: http://www.wediditbubblebash.com

And in person at Southlands Nursery: 6550 Balaclava St, Vancouver, 604-261-6411.

We look forward to seeing you!

A very Special Thank you goes out to the generous Sponsors who have made this event possible: Spectrum Skyworks, Great Canadian Gaming Corporation, Kingswood Capital Corporation, Intergulf Development Group, Focus Real Estate, Season’s in the Park Restaurant, Holly North, Victoria Gin, and Pace Group.



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